Colgate Announces Winners of the Inspire Our Future Scholarship 2022
Colgate-Palmolive Announces Winners of 2022 Inspire our Future Scholarship

Ten Black and African American Students Awarded $10,000 Educational Scholarship to Pursue Supply Chain, Engineering, Sales and Marketing Degrees

August 31, 2022

Colgate-Palmolive Company, a caring, innovative growth company reimagining a healthier future for all, is proud to announce the recipients of its first annual Inspire our Future scholarship, designed to encourage and support Black and African American students who demonstrate a sustained commitment to supporting their communities. 

Congratulations to the winners of the 2022 Colgate-Palmolive Inspire Our Future Scholarship:

  • Jade Blanchard, Howard University 
  • Rayna Carter, Howard University
  • Dylan Gray, North Carolina State University 
  • Lugano Mwakatapanya, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Jamillah Powell, Rutgers Business School
  • Miya Sanders, Delta State University
  • Marcus Rose, Delaware State University
  • Shergaun Roserie, Howard University
  • Eljin Rhymes, Florida A&M University 
  • Tyler Turman, Clemson University

The ten scholarship recipients who are pursuing degrees related to supply chain, engineering, sales or marketing have been selected to receive an annual award of $10,000. Selection was made on the basis of factors such as their academic record, demonstrated leadership and participation in school and community activities, work experience, a statement of educational and career goals and objectives, and online recommendations.

Colgate-Palmolive has partnered with Scholarship America, a non-profit organization that partners with students, parents, colleges, businesses, and communities to help students fulfill their college dreams. The awards are renewable for up to two years or until a bachelor’s degree is earned, whichever occurs first. Recipients can use funds not only towards tuition at an accredited college or university, but also for other educational expenses like on-campus housing, textbooks, laptops and more.

“Our company is reimagining a healthier future for all, and our DE&I efforts are central to that purpose,” said Derek Gordon, Colgate-Palmolive’s Chief Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Officer. “The Inspire Our Future scholarship will help give underrepresented students across the United States the opportunity to thrive.”

Colgate-Palmolive is committed to being an ally and driver for positive change in the communities we serve. To learn more here.

“I am proud of the ten scholarship winners, who are making an impact now and have a very promising future ahead of them,” said Jesper Nordengaard, President, North America, Colgate-Palmolive. “I’m thrilled that we can play a role in helping them pursue their goals.” 

Colgate is honored to lift up the voices of the recipients of the Inspire Our Future scholarship, who are leaders within their communities and will continue to make an impact in their future endeavors. Hear in their own words how this scholarship will empower them to aspire to their goals and, in doing so, reimagine a healthier, brighter future for all: 

What inspires you to make a difference within your community?

“My desire to see others succeed inspires me to set an example. I know that in today’s culture, people are often motivated by the actions of others. I grew up in a small, rural community in the Mississippi Delta where advanced education is not common. I want to set the example of what can be accomplished when you push yourself to go beyond what’s always been done. Going to school is not easy, and it is not always fun, but it helps set you up to earn greater income, go higher in your profession, and understand more about other cultures and world events. I’m inspired to set the example for children who see me do life differently, understand that they can also live a bigger and better life.” – Miya Sanders, Delta State University 

“What inspires me is wanting those who come after me to have a better way than I did.” – Dylan Gray, North Carolina State University 

“Since living in Florida, I’ve seen the aftermath of major hurricanes, specifically hurricanes Michael & Hermine. After being a part of the Red Cross natural disaster clean up, I knew that engineering could enable me the tools to provide back to the impoverished communities that were negatively affected by the destruction.” – Eljin Rhymes, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University 

“Coming from a small blue collar town, there was little to look up to. The community pushed the youth to strive for excellence and better themselves. Yet, not having visual representation of what excellence looks like or the funds to pursue higher education, makes it difficult to envision. So I strive to make a difference and show others in similar situations that it can be done.” – Tyler Turman, Clemson University 

“I want to change the perception of urban black women. I am passionate about challenging the stereotype that the only viable professional careers for women who look like me are healthcare or entertainment. Studies show that less than 15% of supply chain professionals are black women. I want to be an inspiration for people and other brown girls who may not even know what supply chain is.” – Jamillah Powell, Rutgers Business School 

Why are you interested in pursuing a degree in supply chain, engineering, sales or marketing?

"My interest in engineering stems from my belief that one single engineer can impact the lives of millions of people. By tackling some of the world’s greatest issues, we develop solutions which can empower other individuals and make our communities better. I believe that as an engineer, the scope of the positive impact you can have is limited only by your imagination.” – Shergaun Roserie, Howard University 

"I'm interested in pursuing a degree in mechanical engineering because it will give me the resources I need to revolutionize our essential mechanical systems. I want to transform our methods of waste and pollution management. My goal is to develop a new wave of creative solutions to the issue of climate change. Engineering has the power to change the world. However, when done through an environmentally conscious lens, engineering has the power to save the world.” – Rayna Carter, Howard University 

What advice do you have for aspiring Black or African American students who are interested in going into these fields?

“Working within a Supply Chain framework allows many options for your future and is a great career path. For many students their interests, desires, and goals may change over time. The great thing about a Supply Chain career is that there are so many options and directions that as your goals change you can easily change within the Supply Chain careers and grow within.” – Marcus Rose, Delaware State University 

“I would tell African American students never to compare themselves to others, especially when surrounded by brilliant people who look like you. Coming from an HBCU, I am surrounded by students making the same strides as me and coming from similar situations, but I always find those key points that make you unique and stand out. Always congratulate yourself because you have to be your number one supporter if no one else is. Many people in this world don't want to see you succeed, but that does not mean you can not be. Make those connections with those who want to see you be better and network to get to where you want to be; you're halfway there.” – Jade Blanchard, Howard University 

“Always ask for what you need. It is easy to feel defeated by your surroundings, but there are always people who want you to succeed and are here to support you! Whenever possible, ask for help, ask for extra resources, and ask for opportunities. You never know what you'll find!” – Lugano Mwakatapanya, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

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